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Updated Wednesday, March 30, 2016

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For our deceased alumni and deceased faculty membersWe honor and remember the lives and careers of friends no longer with us.

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(Revised 2/19) Dan Matlock (MSc 1981) and Pony Ellingson (MSc 1980) founded Pacific Groundwater Group in 1987 and still work there.  The company has benefited greatly by the education and contacts generated through HWR.  Larry Onyskow--he of the 10-pound key chain--was in charge of assigning offices in 1978, and he apparently allocated all students with beards, and a few others, to the “auxiliary” HWR offices in Bear Down gym, thus Dan and Pony met.  Also in the east wing of Bear Down were Fred Marinelli, Mike Foley, Dr. Chris Watts, Charlie Anderson, and Paul Hsieh.  However, Paul was promoted to an office in Old Main after the first quiz of the semester.  Primary benefits of a Bear Down office included the great view of cheer leader practice and an unmonitored refrigerator.  Larry’s other great contribution was the advice that all new students should invest in Ven T. Chow’s Applied Hydrology, a 20-pound book I did buy, and never once used.  Peter Schwartzman (MSc, 1989) became Pacific Groundwater Group’s first employee in 1989.  Peter has stayed with us and is our newest principal and owner.  Other alumni who have worked at Pacific Groundwater Group include Jim Mathieu (MSc 1989), Laura Strauss (UofA Geology, 1986), and Joel Massmann (at HWR while his prof R. Alan Freeze was there on sabbatical).  We continue to work in water supply, environmental cleanup, and land use hydrology (including storm and reclaimed water infiltration), and generally enjoy the confidence of our colleagues, clients, and regulators.  HWR has been a very important part of our success.  John Ward, Fred Marinelli, Paul Hsieh, Dan, and Pony have established a recreational group called “waning gibbous”.  The name derives from John (Ward)’s keen awareness of the phase of the moon, and loose analogy to self-important, aging hydrogeologists.  We have toured Lake Mead by house boat and camped on the Olympic Peninsula.  More adventures are planned!

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From Peter Feldman (pfeldman at fastmail.fm):  As another ‘alum’ of Bear Down Gym, I greatly appreciate Pony, Dan and Peter’s posting on that fine, modern office complex (and hope it hasn’t been ‘gentrified’ since). I would very much like to join the reunion – but my work/travel schedule looks to be getting in the way. I hope everyone has a great time and will be thinking of you all. My experience studying HWR at the U of A, and the many friends and colleagues I made there, had a profound influence on my life. When not studying for the next ‘quiz’ over at Bear Down, I got to know a number of HWR and other grad students who were from different parts of the world, or who had worked internationally. In fact, HWR friend and classmate Peter Schwartzman and I helped organize an informal seminar that focused on international issues related to water and the environment. Through this seminar, and the encouragement of folks like Jerry Grondin, Ron Parker and other U of A grad students, I ended up in the international development field. Since leaving HWR in 1988 (MS Hyd), I’ve primarily worked internationally on water resource, environment, sanitation, and hygiene issues for the US Government, non-profit agencies like Plan International and Partners for Development, and international organizations like UNICEF, WHO, the World Bank, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. I have continually drawn upon my knowledge of water resources gained at HWR in these, and other professional positions. I’ve had the good fortune to have been based in Ghana, Cambodia, Thailand, and Ethiopia, and have conducted assignments in many other countries, principally in East and South Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa. I will soon start a new position as a Senior Programme Manager with WaterAid UK, but will remain based with my family in our current home in Seattle, Washington. I hope the reunion is a great success, look forward to hearing and reading more about it in the weeks to come, and hopefully renewing contact with old friends and colleagues in the process.  Friends: Feel free to contact me by email (above).

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From William Little (BS 1967, MS 1968) -  After a 40 year career in environmental services and regulatory compliance, I am happily retired in Las Cruces, New Mexico. Friends, please contact me at: wmlittle@zianet.com  -  Have a great reunion, everyone!

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From Jim Mathieu (MS 1988)

Ode to H2O

You've been within me
for as long as I can remember
bringing nourishment
that gave me life

I danced
on your shapely curls
by the shore
Glided over
your solid surfaces
Felt your warm heaviness
on my open skin

In the 80s
I traveled to Tucson
to learn
more of your moods--
polar, fractionated, continuous
from elders
who know you well

With knowledge
I spoke of you often
To others
who wanted you
for their grand ideas, or
just as you are

I waded
in your palaces--
home to your companions
--frogs, birds, lilies
I searched for you
in holes
that penetrated your frame

And you were there
for us and me

I must ask
your forgiveness
for my abuses
in capturing you
binding and bending you
into vessels
When,
what you really wanted,
was to find your
natural path
from high to low
Your
espace de liberté

Alas,
In spite of
my behavior,
our behavior
You have always
been there for us
for me--thank you

Jim Mathieu
jim@nlwinc.com

In honor of my Hydrology & Water Resources professors and friends who shared their water knowledge and wisdom with me

(Revised 2/19) Dan Matlock (MSc 1981) and Pony Ellingson (MSc 1980) founded Pacific Groundwater Group in 1987 and still work there.  The company has benefited greatly by the education and contacts generated through HWR.  Larry Onyskow--he of the 10-pound key chain--was in charge of assigning offices in 1978, and he apparently allocated all students with beards, and a few others, to the “auxiliary” HWR offices in Bear Down gym, thus Dan and Pony met.  Also in the east wing of Bear Down were Fred Marinelli, Mike Foley, Dr. Chris Watts, Charlie Anderson, and Paul Hsieh.  However, Paul was promoted to an office in Old Main after the first quiz of the semester.  Primary benefits of a Bear Down office included the great view of cheer leader practice and an unmonitored refrigerator.  Larry’s other great contribution was the advice that all new students should invest in Ven T. Chow’s Applied Hydrology, a 20-pound book I did buy, and never once used.  Peter Schwartzman (MSc, 1989) became Pacific Groundwater Group’s first employee in 1989.  Peter has stayed with us and is our newest principal and owner.  Other alumni who have worked at Pacific Groundwater Group include Jim Mathieu (MSc 1989), Laura Strauss (UofA Geology, 1986), and Joel Massmann (at HWR while his prof R. Alan Freeze was there on sabbatical).  We continue to work in water supply, environmental cleanup, and land use hydrology (including storm and reclaimed water infiltration), and generally enjoy the confidence of our colleagues, clients, and regulators.  HWR has been a very important part of our success.  John Ward, Fred Marinelli, Paul Hsieh, Dan, and Pony have established a recreational group called “waning gibbous”.  The name derives from John (Ward)’s keen awareness of the phase of the moon, and loose analogy to self-important, aging hydrogeologists.  We have toured Lake Mead by house boat and camped on the Olympic Peninsula.  More adventures are planned!

Cara McCarthy (MS 1990) writes: "As the months have gone by, I continue to read about the reunion and wish I could make it! As it turns out, April 1 typically is the most important water supply forecast of the year (well, not in Arizona where the snow is gone but in the rest of the West!), so I'll be working this weekend to get the forecasts out. I wish everyone well!"

From W. Paul Miller (wpmiller42 at gmail.com):  I have lots of HWR stories, but my favorite is how I actually got into HWR.  I was about to graduate high school, and I had already decided that the University of Arizona was the place for me. I had visited the campus and just loved how welcoming the University was; it felt like home right away.  Anyway, I was making a return trip to Tucson to get a feel for possible majors, take some placement tests, and register for classes.  I--along with hundreds of other soon-to-be Wildcats--gathered on the Mall to tour possible majors.  At the time, I thought my future was in the English department, or maybe Journalism.  I love to read and write, and envisioned myself writing persuasive pieces to encourage environmentalism and to champion just causes. Well, it seemd like everyone else had the same idea as well that day.  I saw a crowd of students lining up behind two volunteers from the College of Arts and Letters to take what would almost assuredly be a very non-personal tour.  But off to the side, completely by himself was a happy-looking older professor, who seemed very comfortably dressed.  I thought to myself, "I'm going to see the campus either way, why not get the personal tour?"  That professor was Dr. Don Davis.  And he asked me if I was interested in water resources and I told him that I was from the environmental standpoint.  I told him that I thought I could write well, and I was interested in environmentalism.  So he showed me around campus.  I remember walking by the baseball and tennis fields and him telling me that he liked to see the baseball games.  And he continued to ask about what kinds of careers I was interested.  I told him I wanted to do something that I was passionate about, that I felt helped people; a career where I got to work with people with similar outlooks.  He mentioned that a degree in hydrology could take you anywhere.  I could go into environmental law, academics, consulting, science reporting, etc....  at the time it really seemed too good to be true. So after touring campus, Dr. Davis mentioned that since HWR was in the College of Engineering, he had to show me around Engineering.  We went to optical sciences, material sciences, and civil engineering.  To myself, I thought, "I am NOT an engineer."  But then we got to the HWR department.  We went into some different labs, and it just seemed so cool!  All the students seemed to be happy, and I distinctly remember someone talking to me about new ways of treating wastewater and how it could be implemented in developing countries.  Everyone was just so nice to me.  So I thought, "I'll give this a shot.  If I don't like it, I can always change majors."  But I never did.  I met so many great teachers and people through the HWR department, many of whom I still work with and communicate with today.  It's amazing how far the reach of the HWR deparment is, and has been, personally for me.  I'm looking forward to the reunion! 

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From Shlomo Orr (PHD 1993):  Friends, contact me at Shlomo.orr at gmail.com!

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Evan Paleologos (PHD 1994) writes "I have been following the information on the reunion and I wish I could join you all! Unfortunately, I cannot travel at this time, so I will not be there. My best wishes to you all for the hard work and continued success to the department of which we are very proud to have graduated. Best regards, Evan - Professor and Interim Chair, Civil Engineering; Director, Center on Sustainable Built Environment, Abu Dhabi University, Abu Dhabi, UAE"

Barney P. Popkin (UA HWR Hydrology MS '73, Soil & Water Science PhD (ABD) '76) spent 45+ years in environmental, water resources exploration and development, water and wastewater treatment and reuse, soil and water, solid and hazardous waste management, and project monitoring and evaluation primarily throughout the U.S. and Asia and the Middle East. He is a California Professional Geologist and Registered Environmental Assessor and Georgia Professional Geologist, and an awarded USAID/ Asia Near East Environmental Protection Officer/ Cognizant Technical Officer/ Agency Water and Biodiversity Conservation Team Member, and awarded USGS/ Texas Hydrologist. Mr. Popkin's accomplishments include: discovering a large, fresh, artesian groundwater supply for Houston; saving private sector clients millions of dollars through innovative hydrologic analysis and engineering designs; founding the MONA (monitored natural attenuation) oil-spill remediation strategy, now the presumptive remedy where appropriate; moving the Red Sea for Seawater Farms Eritrea; restoring Iraqi Oil for the USACE; training 1000s of U.S. and host country nationals in environmental protection and environmentally sound design; managing a $60B portfolio of over 1,000 USAID projects; and serving as Water Resources Group Manager, Water Group Vice President, Geosciences Team Leader, Technical Director for several U.S. environmental engineering firms as as Chief of Party and Team Leader for several Asian Development bank and USAID projects. At the University of Arizona, Mr. Popkin had several assignments, including as technical abstractor for Arid Lands' Selected Water Resources Abstracts, research assistant in urban hydrology and numerical modeling for the Water Resources Research Center, project manager/ hydrologist for the Environmental Research Laboratory; and researcher assistant in saline-water crop irrigation for the Department of Soils, Water and Engineering. For the UA Hydrology and Civil Engineering Departments, he completed the ongoing stochastic hydrology research for a deceased professor. He taught at several universities, community colleges, and conference workshops, including at the UA and Pima Community College, and has over 100 published articles and presentations, including several in Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest. His most recent assignment was as team leader for water, energy and solid waste management for a USAID/ Jordan social marketing for public action environmental plan assessment. He currently takes short-term technical assistance assignments for the Asian Development Bank and USAID, and tutors adult basic literacy in Tucson.

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Leticia Rodriguez-Vionnet (PHD 1995) has been following every news item related to the reunion event. "I regret so much not being able to share this great moment with the HWR community!  I wish all the organizers and attendees the best for the reunion. Have a wonderful time in Tucson!  My best regards from Argentina, Leticia Rodriguez-Vionnet"

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Dan Matlock (MSc 1981) and Pony Ellingson (MSc 1980) founded Pacific Groundwater Group in 1987 and still work there.  The company has benefited greatly by the education and contacts generated through HWR.  Larry Onyskow--he of the 10-pound key chain--was in charge of assigning offices in 1978, and he apparently allocated all students with beards, and a few others, to the “auxiliary” HWR offices in Bear Down gym, thus Dan and Pony met.  Also in the east wing of Bear Down were Fred Marinelli, Mike Foley, Dr. Chris Watts, Charlie Anderson, and Paul Hsieh.  However, Paul was promoted to an office in Old Main after the first quiz of the semester.  Primary benefits of a Bear Down office included the great view of cheer leader practice and an unmonitored refrigerator.  Larry’s other great contribution was the advice that all new students should invest in Ven T. Chow’s Applied Hydrology, a 20-pound book I did buy, and never once used.  Peter Schwartzman (MSc, 1989) became Pacific Groundwater Group’s first employee in 1989.  Peter has stayed with us and is our newest principal and owner.  Other alumni who have worked at Pacific Groundwater Group include Jim Mathieu (MSc 1989), Laura Strauss (UofA Geology, 1986), and Joel Massmann (at HWR while his prof R. Alan Freeze was there on sabbatical).  We continue to work in water supply, environmental cleanup, and land use hydrology (including storm and reclaimed water infiltration), and generally enjoy the confidence of our colleagues, clients, and regulators.  HWR has been a very important part of our success.  John Ward, Fred Marinelli, Paul Hsieh, Dan, and Pony have established a recreational group called “waning gibbous”.  The name derives from John (Harshbarger)’s keen awareness of the phase of the moon, and loose analogy to self-important, aging hydrogeologists.  We have toured Lake Mead by house boat and camped on the Olympic Peninsula.  More adventures are planned!

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Leticia Rodriguez-Vionnet (PHD 1995) has been following every news item related to the reunion event. "I regret so much not being able to share this great moment with the HWR community!  I wish all the organizers and attendees the best for the reunion. Have a wonderful time in Tucson!  My best regards from Argentina, Leticia Rodriguez-Vionnet"

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